revenue and welfare effects of fiscal harmonization for the UK
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revenue and welfare effects of fiscal harmonization for the UK by Elizabeth Symons

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Published by University of Warwick, Dept. of Economics in Coventry .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Elizabeth Symons and Ian Walker.
SeriesWarwick economic research papers -- no.303
ContributionsWalker, Ian, 1945-, University of Warwick. Department of Economics.
The Physical Object
Pagination18p. ;
Number of Pages18
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14872046M

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"The Revenue and Welfare Effects of Fiscal Harmonization for the UK," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(2), pages , Summer. Symons, E. & Walker, I., " The Revenue And Welfare Effects Of Fiscal Harmonization For The Uk," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) , University of Warwick, Department of Economics. Keywords: indirect tax harmonization, origin principle, reform of commodity taxes. JEL Classification: F15, H 1. Introduction Some of the contributions in the recent literature on multilateral tax reforms have fo-cused on the discussion of the welfare effects arising from indirect tax harmonization poli-. Lee, C., Pearson, M. and Smith, S. (), ‘Fiscal Harmonisation: An Analysis of the European Commission’s Proposals’, Institute for Fiscal Studies, Report Series no Google Scholar Smith, A. and Venables, A. () ‘Completing the Internal Market in the European Community: Some Industry Simulations’, Centre for Economic Policy Author: Stephen Smith. The fiscal crisis and welfare benefits in the UK: big cuts and radical reforms Mike Brewer Professor of Economics, ISER, University of Essex Research Fellow, Institute for Fiscal Studies (drawing on work by James Browne, Rowena Crawford, Carl Emmerson, Wenchao Jin, Robert Joyce and Gemma Tetlow at the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

Analysis of the impact of individual welfare reforms Child Benefit is withdrawn where someone in the household has a taxable annual income of more than £50, Analysis by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) shows that around 36 per cent, or ,, more families in the UK will lose some Child Benefit in –20 than in – This is.   1. Introduction. Some of the contributions in the recent literature on multilateral tax reform have focused on the welfare effects of indirect tax harmonization policies (Keen, , Lockwood, Keen, Turunen-Red and Woodland, Keen and Lahiri, Kanbur and Keen, Lopez-Garcia, ).The models underlying these contributions usually assume that tax revenue is returned . and thus force foreign tax hikes or expenditure cuts that are potentially welfare-reducing. This third channel (called, tax–revenue erosion channel) is a by-product of the price and wealth channels. The effects of tax harmonization reforms can thus be broken up conceptually into two.   On the other hand, universal programs are very costly and we cannot expect the future welfare state to be able to rely on much less revenue than the current situation. Moreover, while there are important differences between countries in the level of public social expenditures, such differences appear much smaller when private compulsory.

This thesis contains three chapters, each concerning the social welfare effects of fiscal policy. The first chapter examines the changes to government spending and tax rates that achieve a potentially substantial reduction in government debt at least cost to social welfare. The consequences of altering the speed of debt reduction are also examined.   Finally, we conduct a simulation exercise on the effects of capital tax harmonization on fiscal revenues and output in the EU countries. 18 We consider two capital harmonization possibilities: first, harmonization is assumed to take place at the unweighted average capital tax rate, similar to the analysis in Sørensen (); and second.   Dustmann, C. and Frattini, T. “The Fiscal Effects of Immigration to the UK.” Discussion Paper Series, CDP No 22/13, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration, Department of Economics, University College London, ; Dustmann, C. and Frattini, T. “The Fiscal Effects of Immigration to the UK.” The Economic Journal (): FF The results show that this policy, if enacted along the lines followed in harmonizing value-added taxes, yields large capital outflows and a significant erosion of tax revenue for Continental Europe while the opposite effects benefit the United Kingdom. Welfare in the United Kingdom rises as result, while Continental Europe may incur a.